Btb3
Beyond the Blurb: On Critics and Criticism. Published by Cow Eye Press

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09/11/2006

Comments

Rocco DiStreitlmahn

There's already a perfectly good term to describe the common qualities of the works Corey dubs "poetic" -- lyric.

Seán Padraic Birnie

I posted on this exact point over at my blog just yesterday, if you're interested:

http://screenblue.livejournal.com/5808.html

Nice to find this blog, and interesting to note you link to K-Punk's - a journal I know (and admire) through Lenin's Tomb, and I came here through a fantasist's site. My two interests, crossing tracks. Cool...

ed

Well, this all depends on how you define narrative. I would view Sorrentino's "Mulligan Stew," Markson's "Wittgenstein's Mistress," Danielewski's "House of Leaves," Calvino's "Invisible Cities," Gaddis's "The Recognitions," and Nicholson Baker's "The Mezzanine" as being narratives -- all six of which entertain or lay down their visceral cards in some way. It is true that these are not conventional narratives, but they tell stories nonetheless. They all have plots, characters and settings, although they don't exactly spell these out in clear terms to the reader. So the question is whether these books are bound in poetics or bound in narratives. Is it oblique language or stylisitcs that make these muted narratives or heightened poetics? A difficult but interesting question, subject to each individual reader.

Rocco DiStreitlmahn

If the purpose of fiction is not to produce knowledge but rather aesthetic pleasure, why then should authors bother w/ representing "life as it's really lived rather than as 'it could be'" if the representation of life as it could be is also a source aesthetic pleasure?

Jimmy Beck

I always thought "Freytag's Triangle" was a porn movie.

Casey

Casey's a he. There's a very good pair of essays in the latest on aesthetics from Blackwell Publishing, _Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art_ (2006). Make your library get a copy. I'm thinking of articles by Peter Lamarque and Berys Gaut that are about whether or not art (particularly literary art) "can nontrivially teach us." Lamarque and Gaut are reacting to and refining a position first enunciated (in its most recent incarnation, anyway) by Noel Carroll, who seems to be all the rage lately in aesthetics. Interesting post.

May

Exactly, "male" (though my post has been deleted).

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The Art of Disturbance--Available as Pdf and Kindle Ebook
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